Friday, November 21, 2014

White Buffalo, Part 3: Mystery of Lightning Medicine Cloud


Lightning Medicine Cloud with mother
Lightning Medicine Cloud with mother
When a white buffalo was born before 1830, it was born in the wild, a gift from White Buffalo Woman as a sacred reminder of her promise to return to help the people.  The calf was sacred and a gift to all of the people.  Today, the closest thing to a wild buffalo is found in National Parks like Yellowstone.  When a white buffalo calf is born in captivity it can bring great notoriety to the owner but can also bring great tragedy.  Take the case of “Lightning Medicine Cloud” born on the Lakota Ranch near Dallas, Texas owned by Arby Little Soldier.
 

Thursday, November 13, 2014

White Buffalo, Part 2: History

The White Buffalo has been the most sacred living thing to the Plains Indians for over 2,000 years.  Itsee White Buffalo, Part 1: The Legend).  The white buffalo calf brings the promise of great blessings to those who respect and adopt the ways taught by White Buffalo Woman.  But, the calf can also bring a curse to those who ignore the signs and make the wrong choices.
symbolizes the promised return of White Buffalo Woman (
 

Thursday, November 6, 2014

White Buffalo, Part 1: The Legend

The fantastic author, Margaret Coel, has a new book out titled “Night of the White Buffalo“.  In the book, a white buffalo calf is born on a white couple’s ranch in the middle of the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming.  Just the idea prompted many thoughts and questions, so here are the results of my research on the subject.
Big-Medicine 1933-1959 National Bison Range
Big Medicine 1933-1959

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Great Sites, Part 6: Cherokee Crafts

TextilesThis week’s article is on Cherokee crafts from the 18th century explained and demonstrated at Diligwa Village at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma.  This reconstruction of an authentic Cherokee village from 1710 is a great site to visit to get a feel for how the Cherokee lived back then.  Many thanks to Feather Smith and Betty for their contributions.

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Great Sites, Part 5: Cherokee Weapons and Games

This week we are going to explore the weapons and games used by the Cherokee in the 16th century based on the guide and demonstrators of Diligwa Village at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma.


Thursday, October 16, 2014

Great Sites, Part 4: Cherokee Housing 1710

Osiyo.  In this segment, we are going to learn about Cherokee housing, circa 1710, at Diligwa Village at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma.  The village features representative housing, public buildings, ball and game fields, and crafts and weapon demonstrations.  When we visited, our guide was Feather Smith [watch a short video with Feather Smith explaining the housing].
 

Thursday, October 9, 2014

Great Sites, Part 3: Cherokee Heritage Center

Nestled in a thick forest, the Cherokee Heritage Center showcases Cherokee culture and history.   A short, pleasant drive brings you to the shady parking lot with the Cherokee National Museum to the left and the Diligwa–1710  Cherokee Village–to the right.   Three brick columns rise up from a beautiful fountain in front of the Museum to remind us that this was once the site of the Cherokee Female Seminary.  Your first stop is inside the Museum which houses The Trail of Tears exhibit, Trail of Tears Art Show, Museum Store, and Archives.